Season Update: Summer Rates and Doubles Tournament Results


The Season Is Over (But Not Really)

Time has flown by

Junior development programs will be continuing into the second week of June, but most other programs are pretty much done at this point. Despite this however, we will remain open with staff on hand from at least 10AM-2PM to take possible reservations in the case of rain.

Summer rates will be $26 an hour. Please try to call in or otherwise contact us if you want to reserve a court at a certain time. On Tuesdays for example, there is a JDP class from 4-5:30. If told in advance, staff would be willing to stay open for court reservations afterwards.

Again, please call in between 10AM and 2PM, contact us through Facebook or e-mail us at ntcstaff@sbcglobal.net or at newingtontennismarketing@gmail.com.

Doubles Tournament

We had a great time during the Newington Tennis Center Doubles Open last Saturday.

This first round of matches was best of 7 games, the second round of matches was a full set and the third round of matches was two out of three sets.

It was set-up to ensure that every team played exactly three matches. The finals consisted of Joel Magsayo and Dennis Gan facing off against Ben Doolittle and John Augsback. In a tightly contested match, the team of Doolittle and Augsback prevailed after winning a second set tiebreak.

Congratulations to both teams for excellent performances and to all other participants for great competitive sportsmanship. You guys left behind too many slices of pizza though.

Newington Tennis Center Doubles Tournament is Today!


We have the draw and format set, and other players/teams will be coming in to hit on open courts and fill in if necessary. Feel free to come by and check it out.

Start time is 3:00 PM.

The Season is Winding Down


Unfortunately, the tennis season at the center is nearing its finale. Technically speaking, next week is the last week for our season courts. Many have make-ups from snow over the winter or other reasons, so they will be coming in afterwards, but it is still a sad time for the workers here.

We sincerely enjoy your company and see everyone as friends. Perhaps some of us will run into others elsewhere over the summer, but the experience at the center will be sorely missed.

In any event, the JDP sessions are mostly running through the beginning of June. Because of this, if there is a rainy day and you would like to come in, you may be able to. Try to give us a bit of notice though so we can accommodate you.

I know for sure that I will be able to work the desk Tuesdays because I will be working JDP there from 4-5:30..but I would still like to know in advance if I should stay afterwards or not. If it is already raining or is forecasted to rain, I will probably hang out awhile just to see if people call in.

Also, I am looking into running something every once in a while during the night, maybe some sort of open hitting session where people can just figure out what they want to do when they come in, or an occasional mini-tournament. I’d like some feedback on what would be best for the most amount of people..but I am leaning towards something on Friday nights. It would be very cheap.

Tennis Tips Volume IV: Be Confident but not Over-Confident and Diagnosing your Opponent


In terms of confidence, there are two terrible things you could do going into a match. The first thing is to go into it thinking you are going to lose and the second is to take your opponent for granted by thinking he/she is not any good.

I wouldn’t quite recommend adhering to the Middle Way of the Buddha Sidhartha Gautama in terms of confidence, but it is definitely best to avoid being at either extreme before a match. I think it is better to come into a match with unwavering confidence that you are able to win the match instead of being directly in the middle and not having any idea or thinking that you have no chance of winning or losing.

If you enter a match believing that you have no chance of losing, chances are you are going to find yourself surprised at some point in the match. Either the other player is going to get off to a hot start and you will find yourself down a break or you will be up early and allow them to sneak back into the match. In any event, it will cause you to perhaps play erratically and lose sense of any semblance of a strategy you have and force you to gather yourself and get your act together…otherwise you will be in a big hole and drop a set or even worse, lose the match.

It is imperative to feel confident in your abilities and also take note of your opponent’s skills and tendencies during the warm-up period if you haven’t yet seen them play.

Regardless of what you see in this period, your confidence shouldn’t change but your preparation and strategy might…as you pick up on things in the other player’s game that you should take advantage of. Warming-up is just as much for your own skills as it is diagnosing your opponent’s skills. Maybe they seem to have a weak backhand, have shotty volleying technique or have trouble with slice. No matter what you see, you should remain confident that you have the ability to expose the player(s) on the other side of the court and be able to play the best match you can against them.

In terms of your own skills during the warm-up…do not get rattled. It shouldn’t matter if you think that you aren’t hitting or serving well before the match. Furthermore, do not find yourself in awe of the other player. They could look like Pete Sampras in warm-ups and end up being more like Tommy Haas (that might be an on-going joke for my writings). Some people simply are practice warriors that look and play unbelievable until the first serve is hit. Just as you shouldn’t worry about your failures in warm-ups, you shouldn’t let the success of your opponent get to you either. It takes two to tango and you should be confident that you can lead the dance regardless of how the warm-ups go.

In conclusion, the only thing that should really change before or during your match should be your strategy. You should always consider different approaches and remain pragmatic and be able to improvise based on what you see…just do not change how you feel. All that can do is put a self-imposed handicap on the match and start an up-hill battle or a slide down a slippery slope. Stay unwavering on the plateau.

Look ahead physically, stay consistent mentally.